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MUSIC's also a way...

   ... to the 'Anglosphere' :o)
26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 18:18

17 videos from the Education Portal English Courses

explaining  literary terminology

manuscript-featherpen

~ PART III ~ 

Learn about allegories and how stories can be used deliver messages, lessons or even commentaries on big concepts and institutions. Explore how allegories range from straightforward to heavily-veiled and subtle.

In this lesson, explore the different ways authors repeat consonant and vowel sounds in their literary works. Learn about how writers use repeated words and phrases with well-known examples. 

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

In this lesson you will learn how poets and authors use symbolism in their writing to make it more meaningful and interesting. Explore how descriptive writing called imagery appeals to the senses, adding to works of literature.

Published by MMirza - dans LITERATURE
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26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 18:17

17 videos from the Education Portal English Courses

explaining  literary terminology

william.jpg

~ PART II ~

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

 

In this lesson, you will learn about how writers use themes in works of literature as a way to explore universal ideas like love and war. You will also explore motifs, or repeating objects and ideas, which can contribute to theme. 

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view. 

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient. 

Learn about how authors use foreshadowing, both subtle and direct, as part of their storytelling process. Explore many examples of foreshadowing, from classical plays to contemporary stories. 

In this lesson, learn about catharsis, a purging of feelings that occurs when audiences have strong emotional reactions to a work of literature. Explore examples of literary works which lead to catharsis, including tragedies.

Published by MMirza - dans LITERATURE
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26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 17:12

  17 videos from the Education Portal English Courses

explaining  literary terminology

pen 01

~ PART I ~

This series of  videos display illustrative examples to help you define and use these literary terms.You'll be able to...

- identify terms like 'irony', 'foreshadowing', 'catharsis', 'allegory' (& more) ;

- differentiate closely related literary terms like 'metaphor' and "simile' ;

- use the specific terminology to analyse literary excerpts and works...

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Would lend your ears for a moment (or at least your eyeballs)? This lesson will explain what synecdoche and metonymy mean and how to spot them in a piece of prose or poetry.

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

In this lesson, explore how writers use personification to give human characteristics to objects, ideas, and animals. Learn about apostrophe or when characters speak to objects, ideas, and even imaginary people as if they were also characters.

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples

Published by MMirza - dans LITERATURE
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21 février 2014 5 21 /02 /février /2014 21:56

Have you ever heard of the "L.U.S.A." ? :o)

Have a glance at this map :

http://moreintelligentlife.com/sites/default/files/legacy/Literary%20america.jpg

it's a map of the Literary United States of America !

The map was created by Geoff SAWERS and Bridget Hannigan, and dealt with by Simon GARFIELD "Mapping America Writers", an article from  The Economist 's Intelligent Life website (November 2012).

Nowadays word clouds allow us to create any kind of picture-shaped meaningful groups of words. Computers help us do them, but... literary maps aren't recent !

Geoff Sawers and Bridget Hannigan also created literary maps of....

Ireland :

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/a0/4f/e3/a04fe3e211911e0298cb60d6738d6515.jpg

the United Kingdom :

http://laughingsquid.com/wp-content/uploads/literary-map-2678-p.jpg

The literary map of Wales

was created by Geoff Sawers and Gwyn Tudur Davies

http://www.theliterarygiftcompany.com/ekmps/shops/danihall/images/literary-map-of-wales-map-llenorion-cymru-7403-p%5Bekm%5D250x250%5Bekm%5D.jpg

Mind that the authors' names are not randomly located on the map : as Simon GARFIELD explains in his article, as for the U.S.A., "The project exposed literary trends : a tight concentration of old-school stars in the east, and of younger, more experimental writers spreading, pioneer-style, westwards."

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3 juin 2013 1 03 /06 /juin /2013 10:46

The BPI "Polar Américain" page

hosts a file on the American Crime/Detective novels

 

Check it out by clicking on the detective picture :

3040615449_59fec0216b_s.jpg

 

There you'll find links to several referential websites (in French, nevertheless quite interesting) ; the Centre Pompidou Centre Library (aka 'BPI', in French) site also selects a series of major novels in the literary genre.

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17 mars 2012 6 17 /03 /mars /2012 23:19

This funny song about how to write limericks... is partly a limerick itself !

Nick, from the 'Imagine Learning English' software indicates you the steps to write a great  limerick :

Writing a limerick : 9 steps

#1 Know the basic characteristics of a limerick :

A limerick contains five lines. In this mini-poem, the first, second, and fifth lines rhyme, and the third and fourth lines rhyme.

#2 Choose the ending of your first line, usually a geographical place.

#3 Think of lots of different things to rhyme with your first line ending.

#4 Make associations with the rhyme words.

#5 Pick a story that appeals to you, and decide on who the person(s) is you introduce in line.

#6 Make the first line nice and fitting with the meter.

#7 Choose a situation or action in which your person starts off.

#8 Think of a 'turn' or 'twist' in your story, while considering rhyme words for the 3rd and 4th line, but save the punchline for your last line.

#9 Go back to your list of rhyme words and find a nice one to wrap up the story with a punchline.

 

Where does the word 'Limerick' come from ?

It derives from Limerick, an Irish town. Apparently a pub song, or tavern chorus based on the refrain "Will you come up to Limerick ?" where such bawdy songs or 'limericks' were sung...

Published by M. Mirza - dans LITERATURE
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15 février 2012 3 15 /02 /février /2012 10:26

If you like reading comics, you may enjoy

the Classic Comics' version of Shakespeare's "Macbeth"

Discover Act I by clicking on the  illustration below :

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Voodoo-Macbeth-Poster.jpg/153px-Voodoo-Macbeth-Poster.jpg illustration in the Public Domain

Published by M. Mirza - dans LITERATURE
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30 octobre 2011 7 30 /10 /octobre /2011 10:27

Kathryn Stockett's book  "The Help"

somehow started 'buzzing' onlist :)

Up to now, I've only read several excerpts from the book -and watched the official film trailer :

One of the latest posts definitely made me feel like reading the whole novel and watching the film !
Meanwhile, here's a 61'20" interview of Kathryn Stockett on CBS channel : 

Several passages might be used in ESL class (the author's intentions / fiction VS reality / etc...).

I've started gathering resources that might prove useful to ESL teachers interested in having their students discover "The Help" -of course the result will be selective and keep... in progress :)


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17 juillet 2011 7 17 /07 /juillet /2011 15:22

  Kenneth Koch's words

are given rhythm by the visual effect of kinetic typography : "watch" 'You want a social life, with friends' in the video below :

 

You want a social life, with friends.
A passionate love life and as well
To work hard every day. What's true
Is of these three you may have two
And two can pay you dividends
But never may have three.

There isn't time enough, my friends--
Though dawn begins, yet midnight ends--
To find the time to have love, work, and friends. Michelangelo had
feeling For Vittoria and the Ceiling
But did he go to parties at day's end?

Homer nightly went to banquets
Wrote all day but had no lockets
Bright with pictures of his Girl.
I know one who loves and parties
And has done so since his thirties
But writes hardly anything at all.

a poem by Kenneth Koch

 

Hey, should some students hesitate, let me give you a clue : Homer was not an animated character from the Simpsons series                      The poet claims "two can pay dividends", but "you may never have three": do you agree on this ? I guess the answers will all be different -close to philosophy, hmm ? Anyway, I believe only time will tell !


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16 mars 2011 3 16 /03 /mars /2011 23:28

These "top 100 book" are shown on a Guardian infographic :

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/photobylines/2011/3/14/1300105749763/Information-is-Beautiful--001.jpg"Do Top 100 Books polls and charts agree on a set of classics ? [...] the results of over 15 notable book polls, readers surveys and top 100's both popular and high-brow [books /.../] included all Pulitzer Prize winners, Desert Island Discs choices from recent years, Oprah's Bookclub list, and, of course, The Guardian's Top 100 Books of All Time." David McCandless & Miriam Quick explain.  As a result of their frequency analysis of the gathered titles, you get this "'consensus cloud visualisation" of the most mentioned books titles.

What would your Top 100 books be ?

.

Published by M. Mirza - dans LITERATURE
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